Internet Security – Mistaken Beliefs, Pt. 5

This week is our last week of our series on Internet Security. Thank you for reading!

When it comes to Internet security, what you think you know can hurt you. A lot of what passes for common sense about this subject is just plain wrong—and often risky. Below are some more common Mistaken Beliefs.

  • It’s safe to read an email if it comes from someone I know.
    • Trust your suspicions if something appears “off.” Don’t fall for this trick, which criminals have used for years to get trusting users to open malicious email. If the Subject of an email from a friends appears even slightly suspicious, check with the friend directly before opening it. The chances are that your friend’s computer has been infected with malicious software that sent infectious emails to the contacts in their address book, including you.
  • I’m not at risk because I have an Apple computer.
    • While malicious software for Macs is rare, don’t become overconfident. As a Mac user, you’re still vulnerable to phishing and other email scams, as well as criminal websites that try to trick you into divulging sensitive information.
  • A scam or phishing email is easy to recognize because it is poorly written.
    • While this used to be a telltale sign, it is not anymore. While some scams may be easy to spot, criminals have created some very slick emails and bogus sites that even an expert would have a hard time identifying.

Thank you for reading our Internet Security – Mistaken Beliefs tips. Keep checking back for more tips from our bankers!

-Kara S., Chief Information Security Officer

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